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Chase Rubin Reviews

Chase Rubin: The Three Best Tennis Shoes Under $100

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Chase Rubin is a youth tennis volunteer based in Philadelphia. Growing up in a working-class household, he had to drop tennis whenever his family didn’t have the means to support his hobby. As an adult, he works to ensure that young people never have to stop playing the sport. He does so by providing free tennis instruction at local clubs and by helping organize inner-city tennis tournaments. Today, he gives us his top cheap tennis shoe picks.

Tennis can be a very expensive hobby. The rackets alone will set you back hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars, while court fees and instructors will cost more yearly. When it comes to equipment, you have to get the most bang for your buck. While shoes and other tennis apparel can also cost a lot, this is one area where you could actually save, as manufacturers are coming out with mid-range versions of their signature models. Here are some of the best tennis shoes available for under $100 today:

Adidas Barricade V Classic

The latest from the Adidas line of Barricade tennis shoes, the Men’s Barricade V Classic offers the support, traction, and stability that the brand is known for. The Adidas Torsion System locks your feet in place, protecting you from sudden slips and injury. The adiPRENE insert, meanwhile, gives you excellent cushioning and comfort for long, grueling training sessions. Unparalleled traction and durability in the outsole is provided by the adiWEAR rubber compound in a herringbone pattern. At just $79.95, you get top-notch performance coupled with exceptional comfort.

Lotto Raptor Ultra IV Speed

Lotto’s latest addition to the elite Raptor line is a mid-priced shoe that provides professional-level performance. If you rely on your first step to outwit your opponent, the Syn-Pulse cushioning system in the midsole gives you that extra spring, allowing you to take the initiative. Its outsole features the concave ReactiveArch that moves with your foot as it hits the ground, giving you a reasonable amount of cushioning, more energy return, and a higher level of foot-to-ground stability, while Lotto’s patented PuntoFlex technology adapts the shoe to the shape of your foot. It is no wonder that despite its mid-range price of $79.95, the Lotto Raptor Ultra IV Speed is favored by seasoned pros.

Asics Gel Solution Speed 2

While it has been three years since the Asics Gel Solution Speed 2 has been released in the market, this shoe still remains a favorite of both serious players and weekend warriors. At less than 13 ounces, this lightweight tennis shoe will have you flying all over the court quickly and comfortably. In addition, the PHF memory foam heel collar adjusts to your heel, providing a customized fit. The Gel Cushioning System, combined with the Solyte midsole, gives you the ultimate in shock absorption and energy return, and the herringbone outsole provides excellent traction on almost all kinds of surfaces. Overall, this shoe is ideal for your ground game, helping you cover more real estate in less time. At $79, this is a pro-level shoe with a casual-player price tag.

 

 

Chase Rubin on The Top Four Tennis Warmup Routines

Chase Rubin: Top Four Tennis Warmups

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Chase Rubin works with inner-city kids from Philadelphia, teaching them the basics and finer points of tennis. These include serves, forehands, backhands, and smashes. While working with fellow volunteer coaches, he has developed a particular coaching style that has helped him develop high-performing amateur athletes. One thing he always emphasizes in training is the importance of warming up before training or competitive matches.

Tennis is a physically demanding sport, one that works out all the muscles. If you’ve ever tried chasing a fast-moving ball around a surface measuring more than a thousand square feet for the greater part of an hour, you’d understand where I’m coming from. Younger people, with their boundless energy, can keep this pace for a long time. However, as we grow older, we tend to run the risk of injury, especially if we extend ourselves too far.

One way to avoid injury is to warm up before playing. There are many different types of pre-match warmup routines around, but I prefer to keep it old-school. Here are the top five tennis warmups you should perform before taking the court.

Cardio Exercises. Run or skip forward, backward, and sideways for three to five minutes. Start slowly, then go faster by the minute. The aim of this warmup is to get your heart rate and blood circulation up, so better do it slowly and surely.

Muscle Activation. After getting your cardio in order, it’s time to activate your muscles. The goal of muscle activation is not to tire you out; on the contrary, you should feel stimulated after doing a muscle activation exercise. Muscle activation serves as a sort of “encouragement” for muscle groups to work together, and helps people with stability issues. Examples of muscle activation exercises include supine bridges and shoulder rotations.

Range of Motion Exercises. Tennis requires a lot of motion, and your body has to be flexible and rangy enough to reach for and hit the ball. Range of motion exercises open up movement between and among muscle groups, instead of just focusing on just one body part. Examples of range of motion exercises include lunge twists, spine extensions, sumo squat lifts, and thoracic rotations.

Shadowing Exercises. After performing range of motion exercises, you should feel comfortable and flexible enough to get on the court. Not so fast, though – you need to “shadow” your on-court movements before actually grabbing your racket. Shadowing involves mimicking forehands, backhands, serves, overhead shots, smashes, and volleys. Perform these exercises for three minutes, alternating among different shots. Shadowing also allows you to get your mind into the game.

The warmup routine above should take no more than ten to fifteen minutes. Doing a warmup for a longer time might result in premature fatigue, and thus should be avoided. At the same time, warming up for a period shorter than recommended might result in injuries during or after the warmup. Remember, whenever you warm up, you are actually getting your body ready for the physical battles ahead. When you warm up, warm up like you mean it!

 

 

Chase Rubin on Food and Your Mood

Chase Rubin Talks About How Food Affects Our Moods

Chase Rubin has discovered considerable evidence that has linked an unhealthy diet to obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cancer. It is now understood how chronic obesity ages us and then underlies the foundation of our death. Furthermore, obesity leads to body-wide chronic inflammation that predisposes us to depression and dementia. However, these are all the long-term consequences of our diet upon our body and brain. What about the short- term consequences? Can specific nutrients in my breakfast or lunch influence my brain’s function today? Intuitively, we would all agree that this is certainly likely. After all, being depressed or anxious can lead to poor dietary habits; conversely, poor dietary choices can lead to depression and anxiety.

Can your diet really help put you in a good mood? And can the food you choose to eat encourage bad moods or mild depression? While certain diets or foods may not ease depression (or put you instantly in a better mood), they may help as part of an overall treatment plan. There’s more and more research indicating that, in some ways, diet may influence mood. Basically the science of food’s effect on mood is based on this: dietary changes can bring about changes in our brain structure, both chemically and physiologically, which can lead to altered behavior.

So how should you change your diet if you want to try to improve your mood? Eating fast food like hamburgers, sausages, and pizza, as well as commercial baked goods such as muffins, doughnuts, and croissants has been shown to be associated with an increased risk for depression. Do your best to balance out your food choices with some healthy, fresh options whenever available. We already know that a Mediterranean diet full of vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, fish, and olive oil reduces inflammation and may be beneficial for heart health. But eating a Mediterranean diet can also protect against and prevent depressive disorders. If you aren’t going to Spain or Greece anytime soon, pretend you’re there by copying their diets. Add more veggies to your potlucks, or shake on the herbs and spices to reduce inflammation.

It’s not just a bad mood that can lead to eating more food. Negative mood and positive mood can BOTH lead to more food intake. This research doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t be in a good mood! Try to find a balance in your moods, keeping steady and stable without the extreme peaks and valleys that could cause you to overeat. A study revealed that the more calories, saturated fat, and sodium people ate, the more negative mood they reported two days later. The researchers suggest that certain food types can cause mood shifts.

Take time to taste your food and have awareness that the emotions you are feeling are not only influencing what you are eating but how things taste. If you take your time to eat mindfully, you’ll be more in the moment, and, as the studies suggest, you’ll likely eat less and feel more satisfied. Eat healthier and you’ll see the changes in your mood instantly.

 

 

Chase Rubin’s Top Tennis Courts in Philadelphia

Chase Rubin Lists the Top Tennis Courts in Philadelphia

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Chase Rubin has lived in the greater Philadelphia area since he was a young boy. He remembers being taken to the local tennis club during weekends, then playing tennis for his high school team. While he isn’t as sprightly as before, he still has a mean top-spin serve—one that keeps him competitive in Philadelphia’s indoor and outdoor courts. He has played on most of them, and today, he gives you his impressions of the top tennis courts in the Philadelphia metropolitan area.

Philadelphia has a very long tennis tradition. Over the past century, it has produced Grand Slam and Davis Cup winners such as Bill Johnson, Bill Tilden, and Vic Seixas, and part of their success could be attributed to the presence of top-notch tennis facilities in the area. If you’re moving to Philadelphia or just passing by and want to play some tennis, here are the top courts I would recommend for you.

4. Hecht & Hamlin Tennis Centers Located inside the campus of the University of Pennsylvania, the Hecht and Hamlin Tennis Centers have a total of twenty indoor and outdoor courts between them. The Hecht Tennis Center features eight indoor courts and is open year-round, while the Hamlin Center has twelve all-weather courts with a great view of downtown Philadelphia. Access to the facilities, though, is limited to alumni, students, or employees of the university.

 

3. Germantown Cricket Club. Located just 15 minutes outside Center City, Germantown Cricket Club has 24 grass courts, twelve clay courts, four indoor courts, two hard courts, a squash court, and a bowling alley. While it is a private club, it continuously accepts memberships. Also of note is the stately clubhouse, which is a National History Landmark. As one of Philadelphia’s largest country clubs, Germantown Cricket Club has rolling green fields that make it a favorite venue for events such as weddings and receptions.

2. The Racquet Club. Considered one of Philadelphia’s most exclusive social and sports clubs, The Racquet Club offers facilities for squash, racquets, and court tennis. The latter sport is the forerunner of modern lawn tennis and The Racquet Club’s court tennis facilities are one of only a few such courts in the United States. If you ever get invited here, the Club requires business casual attire, unless if you’re actually on the court and playing. The Racquet Club, with its Colonial Revival architecture, is in the National Register of Historic Places and is the top venue for events among the city’s elite.

1. The Philadelphia Cricket Club. With 21 grass courts, nine fast-drying Har-Tru courts, and two indoor courts for winter games, the Philadelphia Cricket Club is one of the best clubs anywhere in the country. With lights installed at the fast-dry courts, you can play well into the evening. After your match, visit the Porch and enjoy what has been called the best al fresco dining experience in the city. If you’re not done hitting balls, the Philadelphia Cricket Club is also home to a championship-level 18-hole golf course.

Chase Rubin: Does Roger Feder Still Have It for Other 2017 Majors?

Chase Rubin: Why 2017 Is A Pivotal Year for Men’s Tennis

Real estate development professional Chase Rubin is a devoted tennis fan who first started playing the sport at an early age. He applies the lessons he learns in tennis like focus and discipline in his day to day work.

Were you able to catch the Federer-Nadal Australian Open final? News reports say that over 15 million people from all over the world turned on their TV screens that fateful day to tune in to the historic match. I’m not at all surprised by the spectacular turn out in ratings, given that it’s been six years since they last faced each other in a Grand Slam final. Watching those two is always more exciting for me anyway than watching Murray-Djokovic, which is another brewing rivalry among tennis’ greatest, but that’s another story.

Now that Fed has another Grand Slam to his record, fans are now wondering what lies ahead. This year is going to be pivotal, in my opinion, in the narrative of men’s tennis. Here’s why: all the best players will finally be in their 30s, not just Roger and Rafa. Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray are both turning 30 this May, a few days before the kickoff of Roland Garros on May 28. Other top-seeded players like Stan Wawrinka, Gaël Monfils, and Tomáš Berdych are already members of the 30 club.

If you’re wondering why this is pivotal, it’s because age should be really given more weight in the debate about the greatest of all time. Any comparison between players that doesn’t take into account their age is skewed to benefit anyone not named Roger Federer. Think about it—Fed winning another Grand Slam in his mid-30s will definitely put some pressure on the other players into doing the same. Aging spares no one and for these 30-something players, they may need to work extra hard to play at the level Fed is for his age.

No doubt, for having defeated his greatest rival, the King of Clay, Fed stands to benefit from the huge confident boost. He has successfully defied expectations and put to rest questions about his ability and performance, so who knows, we might just witness a rebirth of Roger Federer. Fans have good reason to believe that he can go on to win more Grand Slams. If he can win the Australian Open, I think he’s got a pretty good shot at adding another Wimbledon trophy to his cabinet. Although, personally, it would be something special if Fed chose to devote his time and energy to win another French Open title.

Indeed, the next few years of men’s tennis will be interesting. In an alternative universe where Rafa had defeated Roger at the Australian Open, the narrative would have been different. It would have probably written off Roger Federer for good, effectively putting an end to the remarkable journey of an aging champion.

What do you think? Can Roger win another Grand Slam? Feel free to share your thoughts by leaving me a comment below. I’m Chase Rubin, signing out for now!

 

 

Chase Rubin: What Do Switzerland, Spain, Serbia, and Scotland Have in Common?

Chase Rubin: There’s Something About the Letter “S”

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Tennis fan Chase Rubin is a real estate development professional who loves finding new ways of communicating and interacting with clients. With investment properties all over the country, he likes to meet new people and to foster long-term business relationships wherever he is.

While reading the latest news about the upcoming Davis Cup, it suddenly dawned on me that some of the best players in history right now had something interesting in common. No, I’m not talking about their athleticism or their world records; I’m talking about the country they hail from. Have you ever noticed the fact that the best of the best come from countries starting with the letter S?

Let’s take a closer look:

Switzerland – There are many Swiss professional tennis players who put Switzerland on the map but Roger Federer is on a league of his own. World No. 1 several times over, with 89 career titles, including 18 Grand Slam singles titles, 5 Australian Open titles, 7 Wimbledon titles, and 5 US Open titles, Fed has without a doubt cemented his spot in tennis history with a legacy that many would envy.

Spain – Many fans still think that Rafa will always trail behind Fed, but the King of Clay isn’t king for nothing. The Spanish star has 69 career titles to his name, including 14 Grand Slam titles and 28 titles in ATP World Tour Masters 1000 events, among dozens of other achievements. In my opinion, tennis in the last decade wouldn’t have been as exciting and gripping without the rivalry between Fed and Rafa, and for that, the sport is forever indebted to the two for drawing as much fans as they did.

Serbia – The fated country that crashed Fed and Rafa’s party is Serbia, in the form of Novak Djokovic. Before Djokovic’s run in 2011, few believed the Serbian player could raise his game and compete among the best. And yet that’s what Djokovic did, clinching 69 career titles to date, including 6 Australian Open titles, 3 Wimbledon titles, 2 US Open titles, and 1 French Open title. Between Federer and Nadal, many are still torn about Djokovic’s place among all-time greats. Personally, I think he deserves to be honored as one of the greatest. His matches in the last few years have been some of the best and most tense. Who could forget his epic six-hour matchup against Nadal in the 2012 Australian Open final? Even fans were left exhausted from the anticipation.

Scotland – To complete the list is Scotland, with the ascent of Andy Murray. While the British player may not have as many career titles compared to the other three, he nevertheless has a Wimbledon title under his belt. Plus, he played a superb game against Djokovic at the 2012 US Open, and that’s no small feat.

What do you think? Is there something in the water of these four countries that they seem to produce some of the best players the sport has ever seen? Let me know what you think! I’m Chase Rubin. Please feel free to leave me a comment below.

 

 

Chase Rubin’s Top Tennis Courts in Philadelphia

 

Chase Rubin Lists the Top Tennis Courts in Philadelphia

Chase Rubin has lived in the greater Philadelphia area since he was a young boy. He remembers being taken to the local tennis club during weekends, then playing tennis for his high school team. While he isn’t as sprightly as before, he still has a mean top-spin serve—one that keeps him competitive in Philadelphia’s indoor and outdoor courts. He has played on most of them, and today, he gives you his impressions of the top tennis courts in the Philadelphia metropolitan area.

Philadelphia has a very long tennis tradition. Over the past century, it has produced Grand Slam and Davis Cup winners such as Bill Johnson, Bill Tilden, and Vic Seixas, and part of their success could be attributed to the presence of top-notch tennis facilities in the area. If you’re moving to Philadelphia or just passing by and want to play some tennis, here are the top courts I would recommend for you.

4. Hecht & Hamlin Tennis Centers Located inside the campus of the University of Pennsylvania, the Hecht and Hamlin Tennis Centers have a total of twenty indoor and outdoor courts between them. The Hecht Tennis Center features eight indoor courts and is open year-round, while the Hamlin Center has twelve all-weather courts with a great view of downtown Philadelphia. Access to the facilities, though, is limited to alumni, students, or employees of the university.

 

3. Germantown Cricket Club. Located just 15 minutes outside Center City, Germantown Cricket Club has 24 grass courts, twelve clay courts, four indoor courts, two hard courts, a squash court, and a bowling alley. While it is a private club, it continuously accepts memberships. Also of note is the stately clubhouse, which is a National History Landmark. As one of Philadelphia’s largest country clubs, Germantown Cricket Club has rolling green fields that make it a favorite venue for events such as weddings and receptions.

2. The Racquet Club. Considered one of Philadelphia’s most exclusive social and sports clubs, The Racquet Club offers facilities for squash, racquets, and court tennis. The latter sport is the forerunner of modern lawn tennis and The Racquet Club’s court tennis facilities are one of only a few such courts in the United States. If you ever get invited here, the Club requires business casual attire, unless if you’re actually on the court and playing. The Racquet Club, with its Colonial Revival architecture, is in the National Register of Historic Places and is the top venue for events among the city’s elite.

1. The Philadelphia Cricket Club. With 21 grass courts, nine fast-drying Har-Tru courts, and two indoor courts for winter games, the Philadelphia Cricket Club is one of the best clubs anywhere in the country. With lights installed at the fast-dry courts, you can play well into the evening. After your match, visit the Porch and enjoy what has been called the best al fresco dining experience in the city. If you’re not done hitting balls, the Philadelphia Cricket Club is also home to a championship-level 18-hole golf course.

Chase Rubin on Roger Federer’s Backhand

Chase Rubin Writes About Federer’s Backhand Shots

Chase Rubin has been a passionate tennis fan for as long as he can remember. As a fan from greater Philadelphia, he had to wake up very early to catch the Australian Open men’s final between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, and says that the match was worth the wait. Read his analysis of Federer’s epic victory below.

Roger Federer has always had a hard time going up against Rafael Nadal, including their last six Grand Slam matches since 2007. It has always been thought that Nadal has figured out how to beat Federer – the Nadal template includes a high-bouncing forehand with a lot of spin, something that Federer has had trouble returning, especially with backhand shots.

To understand where Federer is coming from, a bit of dissection is in order. Federer has always been known for his inside-out forehand, which is widely known as the most elegant in the world. His backhand, however, is another story. While Federer’s backhand is considered one of the most beautiful strokes in tennis, it has cost him huge matches, including his last six Grand Slam matches with Nadal. It could be argued that the beauty of his backhand actually works against him, as it is a very precise, powerful stroke that is sadly susceptible to very high, spinning forehands.

But how did Federer pull off the victory against Nadal in the 2017 Australian Open? Surely, he won’t just let go of the strokes that had won him many trophies, right? Well, yes and no. For example, because Melbourne’s courts are notoriously fast, one would think that he’d rush the net each time he gets the chances. However, he attacked with ground strokes, ending up with more than 70 winners on them.

But Nadal, being the tenacious player that he is, peppered Federer with an array of backhands, a skill that he had improved a lot over the past couple of years. The result was that Nadal didn’t give up as much ground on his backhand side compared to previous matches. And being a few years younger, Nadal was able to sustain the sheer power of his shots, aiming his serves straight at Federer and giving his opponent a hard time as the latter found it hard to gain any momentum for his volleys.

Federer soon found an antidote to Nadal’s forehand. With Nadal serving at 3-2 in the fifth set, Federer responded differently to a forehand. Instead of going on top of it, as he would normally do, he instead looped it back even higher, throwing Nadal off the baseline. When Nadal responded with another powerful shot, Federer sent it crosscourt to tie the set at 3-3, a moment that I consider the most pivotal of the match.

Of course, Federer won this with his service aces (he had twenty compared to Nadal’s four) and his forehand (after all, the winning shot, fittingly, was a crosscourt forehand) but it was his backhand responses that kept him afloat. I guess even the Greatest Of All Time can still learn new tricks after all.

 

 

Chase Rubin Talks About the Greatest Players of All Time Per Court

Chase Rubin: Greatest Players of All Time Per Court Type

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Chase Rubin is an established real estate development professional who regularly shuttles back and forth between his hometown of greater Philadelphia and other regions for business. He is also a passionate tennis enthusiast, believing the sport has done wonders to improve his focus. Today, he talks about the greatest players of all time per court type, to settle the score once and for all.

It would seem that tennis fans today have a unanimous favorite in Roger Federer as the greatest tennis player of all time. While Fed certainly has had success in each court type throughout his illustrious career, conferring him such a title without looking at the numbers may only discredit what other players have achieved, in my opinion.

If you’re a huge tennis fan like I am, then you would know that Rafael Nadal is called King of Clay by fans and pundits alike for a reason. The Spanish superstar has 9 French Open Titles under his belt and holds an outstanding 365-34 record on this court type, surpassing that of Federer. At 31 years old, Rafa can still expect to hold onto that King of Clay title for a couple of more years.

To be called the greatest player of all time, however, requires more than just looking at simplistic win/loss ratios. A player’s age, for example, can greatly impact his or her performance later on, which may result into a slow and steady dip in his or her win ratio. This is the exact same reason why hardcore fans of Novak Djokovic can’t easily proclaim the Siberan player as the best player of all time on the hard court, despite his 504-95 hard court record. Sure, he may be the best player in this moment in time but pitted against other players throughout tennis history, Novak, in my humble opinion, will fall short standing beside Fed. Needless to say, I think Fed is the King of Hard Court. One only has to look at what Novak has achieved in fast hard courts—you’re right; not much.

Of course, this discussion would not end without talking about grass. I don’t think I need to make a case for this one: Roger Federer reigns supreme on grass. With 7 Wimbledon titles and 8 Halle Open titles under his belt, Fed has captured the hearts of many with his powerful yet graceful kind of athleticism. It doesn’t hurt he’s an overall nice guy off the court as well. Since claiming the World #1 ranking in 2004, Fed has continued to defy fans and analysts’ expectations, proving time and time again that he really is one of the best ever to have played the sport.

In the end, fans will always have different answers in the discussion of the greatest players of all time, and that’s fine and even fun to talk about. If you have a different opinion than the one I shared here in today’s blog, feel free to leave me, Chase Rubin, a comment with your thoughts. I’d love to hear from fellow fans!

 

 

Tennis News 2/2

Serena and Venus Williams Make History in Australia – Click Here

It seems like Serena and Venus will play tennis forever. Alas, that is not the case and the only undefeated in sports is father time. With that in mind it was amazing that we got to see Serena and Venus in the finals of a major at least one more time before their illustrious careers come to an end. Check out the article for more information or just research it when you have the chance, it was pretty big news.

Roger Federer V Rafael Nadal in Australian Open – Click Here

As if the tennis gods just aligned perfectly to give us the two most wanted finals in the Women’s and Men’s bracket. Federer and Nadal played in the Australian open, giving the last time we might see both of them in a Major Finals. The match as no slouch as it went to the wire with Federer winning three sets to two. For more information check out the link or see if you can watch the replay of the match as it was one for the ages.

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